Revived typewriters. Sculptural work by Jeremy Mayer
Revived typewriters. Sculptural work by Jeremy Mayer
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Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters

Taking typewriters and turning them into sculptures without the use of glue, without welding or soldering anything, may seem impossible, but not for Jeremy Mayer, who is the author of these wonderful typewriter figures.

I don't know if anyone else remembers the old typewriters? How big and formidable they seemed to small children, and what an interesting sound they made every time they pressed their buttons. Then these bulky printing devices were replaced by computers that were no match for the old monsters. There was no longer a need for typewriters, they were thrown away and forgotten. Fortunately, there was a man who came up with a way to give a second life to long-forgotten things. And that was Jeremy Meyer.

Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters

California-based artist Jeremy Mayer has been interested in typewriters since he was a child. His childhood interest has now spilled over into the art of creating sculptures from old printing devices: cats, crickets, skeletons, and even anatomically correct human figures. He finds typewriters in flea markets and second-hand stores, then goes to his studio to take them apart, sort the parts, and start creating. All screws and screws, bolts, springs, pins are involved in the process of creating a solid sculpture. Sizes of the artist's sculptural work range from the smallest 18-inch crickets to 7-foot aluminum skeletons that weigh 60 to 100 pounds. To create a human figure, Mayer requires approximately 40 typewriters and 1000 working hours. Quite a painstaking and laborious creative process.

Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters Sculptural work from Jeremy Mayer's old typewriters

Jeremy Mayer admits that his metal sculptures are a reflection of the author's admiration, that is, his own interest, for the movement of scientific progress.

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