Colorful houses and sophisticated lace: wonders of the Italian village of Burano
Colorful houses and sophisticated lace: wonders of the Italian village of Burano
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Colorful houses in Burano (Italy)

Venice is one of the main Italian attractions, but few people know that there is another architectural wonder literally 40 minutes away from here. This is the island quarter Burano, the most beautiful old fishing village, famous for its colorful houses and specializing in lace making.

Burano Island Quarter (Venice, Italy)

Burano is a historic village. The first settlement on this site was founded by the Romans who fled from the city of Altino during the period of barbarian invasions. Burano got its name in honor of the name of the gates of the destroyed city. The first houses built on the island resembled huts. Later, brick buildings appeared, and local residents began to paint the walls with bright colors. Buildings were decorated in this way not for the sake of beauty: sailors returning from the sea, in the dense fog, could not distinguish gray houses, and multi-colored ones were much more noticeable.

Colorful houses in Burano (Italy)

The tradition of decorating the walls of houses has been passed down from generation to generation. Today this process is regulated by the local administration. Anyone wishing to paint the facade of their house must send a petition to the authorities in order to agree the chosen color with the permitted "palette".

Colorful houses in Burano (Italy)

The island has been inhabited since the 6th century, but it flourished in the 16th century. It was then that the inhabitants of the island started making lace. Apparently, the production technology was borrowed from the craftswomen from the village of Lefkara. Local lace makers made such luxurious products that, as they say, Leonardo da Vinci himself liked them. The famous artist visited Lefkara in 1481, purchased several items, which he presented to the Milan Cathedral to decorate the altar.

The work of local lacemakers

Burano lacemakers were not inferior in professionalism to the Cypriots, their products were exported throughout Europe until the 18th century. After a temporary lull, demand was restored in 1872, when a lace school was opened on the island. Until now, Burano laces are valued all over the world, of course, the most expensive ones are those made by hand using traditional techniques.

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